Wednesday, November 14, 2012

Southern Classics: Squash Casserole Recipe


Squash Casserole. Lucy Mercer/A Cook and Her Books
 I can't imagine a Thanksgiving table without a squash casserole. This Southern standard is warm and rich and filling, like a good side dish should be. I've tried lots of recipes, from the soup can variations to Paula Deen's, and while they are all good, I gotta tell you, this one is the best. It's from Aunt Fannie's Cabin, a restaurant formerly located in Smyrna, Georgia, using the recipes of a freed slave who stayed after the war to cook for her family.

Aunt Fannie's Cabin Squash Casserole


3 pounds summer squash
1/2 cup onions, chopped
1/2 cup butter, melted
2 eggs, beaten
1/2 cup saltine crumbs
Sugar, about a teaspoon, optional
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon black pepper
Additional saltine crumbs for topping

1. Heat oven to 375. Rinse squash and cut into 1/4 inch thick slices. In a medium saucepan, combine vegetables and pour over water to cover. Cook until both are tender. Drain thoroughly, pressing out excess water with back of spoon, and mash together.

2. Combine mixture with half of the melted butter, the cracker crumbs, eggs, sugar (if using), salt and pepper. Pour into a greased casserole dish.

3. Top with remaining butter and sprinkle with additional cracker crumbs. Bake at 375 degrees for 45 to 60 minutes, or until top is golden brown and bubbly.

Text and images copyright 2012, Lucy Mercer. 

4 comments:

Terry said...

I have never had Squash Casserole without either cream of chicken soup, mushroom soup or sour cream and or BOTH! I am going to give this version a try...thank you for sharing!
HAPPY THANKSGIVING!!!

Richard Moore said...

I love squash casserole and my wife makes a great one. We'll have to compare recipes. This looks very similar.

Ah, Aunt Fannie's Cabin. I ate there several times back in the day. There was also Mammy's Shanty, which I believe was near where Peachtree and W. Peachtree met near White Columns. As I recall, Mammy's Shanty had more racially offensive aspects.

magnolia said...

Mmm . . . mine is similar, but in the true Southern way, mine also has heavy cream. Oh, and cheese.

Lucy Mercer said...

My goodness, Magnolia, I would love to try that recipe!